SHARE

Japanese style, culture and fashion are quite more than what most imagine

Japanese Style and Fashion has a variety of styles underneath the Japanese fashion umbrella. Since many of these style tribes can easily crossover and change season to season, classifying them is not easy. Each group is separated into certain kei (style), and there are tons of magazines that target each demographic.

Kireime Kei

japanese style
Japanese style and fashion has been minimal to much extent. Conservative dress style is the essence of achieving a good fit in what you wear and being comfortable. First of all, keeping things simple and neat is the basic traditional preference. There is minimal style risk and no flamboyant display here. Magazines like Men’s Joker cater to this group.
Salon Boy

japanese styleThis particular Japanese style is in line to almost a feminine look and was started by men in beauty schools. Salon boys mix high and low fashion from here and there. Mixing designer brands and old clothes to co-ordinate their looks by paying close attention to accessories. Therefore… scarves, belts, sunglasses, hats and most of all; hairstyles have to be pleasing to the eyes and not messy at all. Magazines like chokichoki and cazicazi promote such style.

 

Mode

japanese style
I may seem like Mode style is the high-fashion set on list, you will find guys dressed in nothing more than the best. Label names are more important to this group. This Japanese style is similar to kireime kei but is more flamboyant, and they aim for higher price pint brands like Dior Homme and Prada. Publications like gap Press Men and Vogue Hommes Japan are in favour of this style. Moreover, it is distinctively on the refined, elegant and classy side as compared to other styles.
Yamamba

japanese style
Another style is the Yamamba  who are ghosts in more ways than one. It is a style is characterized by dark tans, bright clothing and extreme make up around the eyes. Yamamba are rare because even at their peak in the mid 2000s they were hard to find.

Yanki

japanese style
Yanki are a large subculture of youths who project a yakuza-like image. While every country has a population of disaffected youth who rebel against society. Yanki are almost always working class kids. In addition, they may highlight their roots by wearing clothing associated with Japanese construction workers such as over-sized baggy pants and overalls. Crow Zero (Japanese moive) is a classic example of Yanki subculture in the school of Suzuran.

Rockabilly

japanese style
The Tokyo Rockabilly Club is an association of people who like to dress like 50s greasers. They can be found in Yoyogi park on Sundays. These groups love dancing to the old beats and are fun loving entertainers.
Japanese Chicanos

japanese style
Don’t be surprised when you go to Japan and find a person who is not of Mexican descent waving the white, green, and red flag proudly. In addition to Americana, the Japanese have also adopted the Chicano culture. Rather Japanese style fully absorbs the cholo lifestyle by adopting the full khaki with the cuff and crease look. You can probably see them around Japan riding around their low-riders, and blasting a mix of their favorite Japanese cholo and chola artists.
Uruhara Kei

 Uruhara Kei
Uraraha refers to the hidden back alleys of Harajuko, so those who shop at the many secondhand stores are usually the ones labeled with Urahara style. As a result, such style involves lots of layers, and a mix of casual brands and vintage items.