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Style, music, culture and society are all traits that we look for in our wardrobes. We want to look cool, remain relevant and stand out from the crowd. Although designer brands and high street shops provide us with everything we need, independent clothing brands give us a little bit extra. High street fashion has become so diluted only for people to buy it more that it is becoming increasingly difficult to look different.

 Why you should shop independently with independent clothing brands:

Think back to how many times somebody has said to you “I’ve got the same top”, or where you have turned up to an event wearing the same outfit as somebody else. Frankly, independent brands are adding more depth and substance into the style mix that will get you noticed for all the right reasons. Fashion shouldn’t be taken at face value, it should tell a story about the person wearing the clothes and about the world they live in. Over the past decade, independent clothing brands have really taken off, and streetwear brands like BOY London and Hype have become the embodiment of music, art and street culture. If you’re looking for a way to break out of the mould of “sameish” fashion, then here are some of the biggest independent brands you should check out this year. 

Criminal Damage:

 This brand has been on a mission to add weight to the London streetwear scene since 1991. Over the past couple of years, the popularity of Criminal Damage has soared as the need for more substance and less weak fashion has been established. Their wide collection of jackets, sweatshirts and tees cover the dark and sultry, to the bright and bold, making this a really versatile and sought-after brand. If you’re looking for that fresh London look that will have people stopping in the street, then definitely check this brand out!

 

BOY London:

 After its conception in the late 70s BOY London has been adopted as the uniform of choice by every cool and gritty youth group. This brand is the true embodiment of underground rebellion, British style and independent clothing. Since their revival in 2007, this brand has seen countless celebrities sporting the distinctive eagle logo and edgy patterns. Streetwear style is one of the, if not the only, key looks for 2017, so their combination of patterned joggers, leggings, sweatshirts, hats and tees are so on trend and show no style of dying out anytime soon. If you’re looking for an edge that will be a cut above your friends, then BOY London could be the brand for you.

 

Blvck Clothing:

 This lifestyle brand offers simple and affordable clothing that have unbeatable style. After its creation in 2007, the Blvck has flown to success with its conversation-provoking clothing. Creators Michael Yabut and Alfred De Talge filled the gap in streetwear fashion with clothing home to dark imagery and phrases, inspired by religion, politics, death and modern society. If you’re looking for a brand that will add more depth to your wardrobe, get people talking and make people think, then Blvck Clothing is definitely a brand you should consider.

 

 

Folk:

This brand completely sets itself aside from catwalk fashion and concentrates on fine-tuning the contents of our wardrobe. Their minimalistic tones and muted pieces from Folk can transform a whole look. Their slow and steady growth is about to take off in 2017, as they introduce some fresher pieces into the mix. Minimalism has become one of the most popular and affluent styles over the passing years. It has entered our homes, and now it is entering our wardrobes. Folk clothing is a completely unique independent brand that is a step aside from streetwear into cool.

 

Off-White:

 This brand is a vessel for modern street fashion. Over the past year, the popularity of Off-White has blown up and is becoming one of the most sought-after styles, which bridges the gap between high street and streetwear fashion. If you’re looking to stand out from your friends, but not from the crowd, then this brand is the one for you. Off-White studies concepts of branding and youth culture, adding emotionally suggestive text for the embodiment of teenage angst.